Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry

Cellulose dissolution and gelation in NaOH(aq) under controlled CO2 atmosphere: supramolecular structure and flow properties

Authors

  • Guillermo Reyes Biobased Colloids and Materials, Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, FI-00076, Espoo, Finland ,
  • Alistair W. T. King VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Tietotie 4e, FI-02150 Espoo, Finland ,
  • Tetyana V. Koso Materials Chemistry Division, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, FI-00560, Helsinki, Finland ,
  • Paavo A. Penttilä Biobased Materials Structure, Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland ,
  • Harri Kosonen UPM Pulp Research and Innovations, UPM, Paloasemantie 19, FI-53200 Lappeenranta, Finland ,
  • Orlando J. Rojas Bioproducts Institute, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Department of Wood Science, 2360 East Mall, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

Abstract

We investigate the interplay between cellulose crystallization and aggregation with interfibrillar interactions, shear forces, and the local changes in the medium's acidity. The latter is affected by the CO2 chemisorbed from the surrounding atmosphere, which, combined with shear forces, explain cellulose gelation. Herein, rheology, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), small and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS), and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) are combined to unveil the fundamental factors that limit cellulose gelation and maximize its dissolution in NaOH(aq). The obtained solutions are then proposed for developing green and environmentally friendly cellulose-based materials.

Content

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Supplementary material

Thumbnail image of GC_Supporting_5_8_22.pdf
Cellulose dissolution and gelation in NaOH(aq) under controlled CO2 atmosphere: supramolecular structure and flow properties
Experimental section and additional figures