Analytical Chemistry

Metabolomics of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts in Fermented Beverages

Authors

  • Daniel Ellis School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia ,
  • Edward Kerr School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia ,
  • Gerhard Schenk School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia & Australian Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia ,
  • Benjamin Schulz School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia

Abstract

Fermented beverages have been consumed for millennia and today support a global industry producing diverse products. Saccharomyces yeasts currently dominate the fermented beverage industry, but consumer demands for alternative products with a variety of sensory profiles and actual or perceived health benefits are driving the diversification and use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The diversity of flavours, aromas, and other sensory characteristics that can be obtained by using non-Saccharomyces yeasts in fermentation is, in large parts, due to the diverse secondary metabolites they produce compared to conventional Saccharomyces yeast. Here, we review the use of metabolomic analyses of non- Saccharomyces yeasts to explore their impact on the sensory characteristics of fermented beverages. We highlight several key species currently used in the industry, including Brettanomyces, Torulaspora, Lachancea, and Saccharomycodes, and emphasize the future potential for the use of non- Saccharomyces yeasts in the production of diverse fermented beverages.

Content

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