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Identification of Prime Factors to Maximize the Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution of Covalent Organic Frameworks

preprint
revised on 07.03.2020 and posted on 09.03.2020 by Samrat Ghosh, Akinobu Nakada, Maximilian A. Springer, Takahiro Kawaguchi, Katsuaki Suzuki, Hironori Kaji, Igor Baburin, Agnieszka Kuc, Thomas Heine, Ryu Abe, Shu Seki
Visible light driven hydrogen (H2) production from water is a promising strategy to convert and store solar energy as chemical energy. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are front runners among different classes of organic photocatalyst, owing to their tunable porosity, crystallinity, optical and electronic properties. Photocatalytic activity of COFs depends on numerous factors such as band gap, crystallinity, porosity, exciton migration, charge separation and transport, stability etc. However, it is challenging to fine tune all these factors simultaneously to enhance the photocatalytic activity. Hence, in this report, we have prioritized the key factors for efficient photocatalytic H2 production through structure–property–activity relationship combined with microwave spectroscopy and first–principles calculations. Careful molecular engineering allowed us to tune the light absorption (i.e. band gap), crystallinity, porosity, layer stacking and charge carrier generation and transport of a series of isoreticular COFs. We have assessed how these properties and the interplay between them impact photocatalytic activity of studied COFs. From the structure–property–activity relationship, we found that light absorption and charge carrier generation and transport are the prime factors, which influence the photocatalytic H2 production of COFs in much greater extent than other factors.

Funding

This work was partly supported by a Grant–in–Aid for Scientific Research (no. 26102011, 15K21721, 17H06439, 19F19044 and 18H03918)

History

Email Address of Submitting Author

samratghosh8888@gmail.com

Institution

Kyoto University

Country

Japan

ORCID For Submitting Author

0000-0002-5946-3013

Declaration of Conflict of Interest

No conflict of interest

Version Notes

This is the revised version with more experimental results.

Exports